Home Care Services Toronto & North York


TORONTO EAST: 416-423-0963

TORONTO WEST: 416-479-9659

Top 5 Seniors’ New Year’s Resolutions

Yes, seniors’ New Year’s resolutions exist! Of course they do! Many people feel New Year’s resolutions are a waste of time, and are better left ignored. This may be true for those that have no intention of fulfilling and sticking with their goals, but this seems like a poor attitude to adopt. Why make a New Year’s resolution if you have no plan to carry it out? A resolution can be an extremely useful tool with the right dedication and planning. It is human nature to get into regular routines to make daily life organized and manageable. But, it is very easy to become complacent and stagnant if you do not change things up once in a while. The new year is the perfect time to do it. Think of it as a new beginning, without having to forfeit your past accomplishments and efforts. A one-year increment seems to be an ideal period of time to take stock of your current situation, and look for ways to improve on it. Try to keep your resolutions sensible and attainable to avoid disappointment or frustration. Some practical, useful, and reasonable seniors’ New Year’s resolutions are: Exercise Engage in mentally stimulating activity once a day Work on improving one social relationship Do one thing to improve your diet Volunteer Seniors’ New Year’s Resolutions : Exercise It’s true, way too many New Year’s resolutions are based on getting in shape. That doesn’t mean it’s not a beneficial or achievable goal. Too many people set overly lofty expectations, and find it very difficult to keep up. The key is to start small. Begin by...

Foot Care Services in Toronto and North York

There are many foot care services in Toronto and North York. Some are in-home, and others are chiropodists, or drop-in foot care clinics. In-home foot care services are often chosen by elderly seniors who can no longer get out as they used to.   We supply registered practical nurses to your own home to help you keep your feet happy. The focus of care for seniors is typically directed towards joint pain, disease, and mental health. The feet are often overlooked as a potentially problematic area for seniors. This can be quite surprising, considering how much stress and strain are placed on the feet on a daily basis. It is estimated that the average person walks somewhere between 5,000 and 10,000 steps a day. That is a lot of weight and physical force that one’s feet must endure daily. Calculate those numbers over a lifetime, and it is a wonder everyone over 50 doesn’t have serious foot issues. This is a bit of a two-edged sword, because we are told that exercise is extremely important, and that walking is good form of exercise. While this is true, no healthcare professional would recommend exercising at the expense of the health of your feet. Symptoms of Foot Problems If it hurts to walk, that is a fairly obvious sign that you may have something wrong with one or both of your feet. However, there are also some less intrusive signs that a foot issue may be developing. Keep on the lookout for: Swelling Bruising Redness Dry skin Numbness Tingling Brief, shooting pain Causes of Foot Pain The foot is such a complex...

Benefits of Aging Research for Seniors

Aging research includes genomics, and genomics refers to the study of genomes or genes. A genome is the complete set of an individual’s DNA. When using genomes to study and explain the aging process, we can get a better idea of what to expect as we get older. Aging research allows us to examine the age-old debate of Nature vs. Nurture. How much of what we are and what we do is genetic? Aging research and longevity Although research into genomics and how it affects aging is a relatively new area of study, useful information can be gleaned from this research to help with successful aging practices. For example, let’s take a brief look at longevity. Many people want to live as long as possible, as long as they are fairly healthy and pain-free. How influential is genetics on life expectancy? Early studies have shown that longevity is thought to be about 20-30% influenced by genetics. Does this mean that if you are not genetically predetermined for longevity, that you have no chance of living a long and healthy life? The short answer is no. There are many things you can do to improve your longevity, regardless of your genetics. Some steps you can take to increase longevity are: Nutrition Exercise, 150 minutes a week is the guideline Social activity, providing mental stimulation and a feeling of belonging Sense of purpose, can be gained from volunteering or caregiving Genotypes and phenotypes in aging research A genotype refers to the actual set of genes that make up our DNA. Each gene, or set of genes, is responsible for a specific...

Live-in Care Services

Live-in care services is chosen by families who want the peace of mind of having a caregiver with their loved one around the clock. If you are concerned for your love one when they are left alone, and their care needs are complex, live-in care services may be for you. Live-in care services is a popular services for those who have complex care needs, but want to stay in their own home. Having multiple health challenges that affect mobility and independence often comes with the need to have personal support.  Decreased mobility and problems getting around the house may hinder your ability to make meals, do housework, and laundry. Diabetes, dementia, Parkinson’s, and being at risk for falls will also necessitate having a personal support worker (PSW) attending to you. When heavy care is needed, combined with around the clock supervision, there are three main options: Residential care in a long term care home An assisted living floor in a retirement community Live-in care services at home through home care Long term care homes, nursing homes Residential care for people with heavy care needs usually involves seniors moving to a long term care home (also called a nursing home).  While it is true that long term care homes in Ontario supply around the clock supervision, there is possibly only an hour of care delivered to each resident every day. This care may be delivered in three 20 minute segments (morning, afternoon, and night).  Medications will be delivered by staff nurses, and PSWs will deliver the 20-minute segments of personal care (bathing dressing). Therefore, although your loved one would have the safety...

The facts and Fictions of Aging

The are all kinds of facts and fictions of aging that are thought to be inevitable aspects of getting older. Most of these stereotypes tend to lean more towards fiction than fact. Let’s take a look at a few examples of senior stereotypes: Seniors can’t learn new technology Dementia is a natural part of aging Seniors are lonely and isolated Seniors shouldn’t have control over life decisions Seniors can’t live an active lifestyle Seniors and Technology In today’s society, technology plays a big role in our daily lives. Many people believe seniors either have no interest, or are not capable of learning to use new technology. This is simply not true. Sure, a portion of the senior population may feel overwhelmed by the rapidly evolving world of technology, but many learn how to use technology to improve their daily routines. Here is one example of a Canadian woman over a hundred years old, that has incorporated technology into her life. Technology can have serious perks for seniors such as: Social media and email – an easy and convenient way to keep in touch with friends and family Information highway – using the internet to search for new recipes, exercise routines, or any subject imaginable Nostalgia – access to favorite old songs, tv shows, and movies Online banking – taking care of finances from the comfort of home Developing Dementia (one of the biggest facts and fictions of aging) In a lot of cases, people believe Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia to be an unavoidable part of aging. While aging can come with a certain degree of cognitive decline, dementia is by...

5 answers to questions about long-term care homes in Ontario

Long-term care homes in Ontario are for people with significant health challenges and cognitive impairment who need access to nursing care and supervision 24-hours a day. Long-term care homes are also called nursing homes, and should not be confused with the term ‘retirement home’. In Ontario, all long-term care homes are publicly funded and regulated by the Ontario provincial government. Ownership can vary, with 57% of long-term care homes privately owned, 24% owned by non-profit/charitable, and 17% municipal. Operators are mandated to follow the provincial government’s requirements for running a long-term care home, as prescribed by the Long Term Care Homes Act, 2007. 1.      Who gets accepted to long-term care homes in Ontario? Admission criteria for long-term care requires new residents to have high or very high physical and cognitive challenges to qualify. Needing very high needs to qualify, people now come to long-term care at a later stage in the progression of their diseases, when their health issues are more complex, and they are more physically frail. In these later stages of poor health, family or caregivers are no longer able to provide the necessary support at home or in a retirement home. To live in a long-term care home, you must: be age 18 or older have a valid Ontario Health Insurance Program (OHIP) card have health care needs including: 24-hours nursing care and personal care frequent assistance with activities of daily living (ADL) on-site supervision to ensure safety or well-being have health care needs which cannot be safely met in the community though publicly-funded services and other care-giving support have health care needs which can be...
Useful Public Services for the Elderly in Toronto

Useful Public Services for the Elderly in Toronto

There are several services throughout the GTA that make day-to-day life easier and more manageable for seniors. We are lucky to live in one of the most habitable and sustainable cities in the world. Living in Toronto means having access to services and programs that make life more convenient for us as we age. The City of Toronto actually provides a directory detailing all of the different municipal services available for seniors. These services include assistance with healthcare, community activities, transportation, financial assistance, things to do, and food. Today, we are going to take a closer look at two of these services.  Public Services for the Elderly in Toronto: Wheel Trans Wheel Trans is a service designed to accommodate travelers with various different needs. For people with restricted mobility who find it difficult to get around on their own, Wheel Trans can be a very useful option. Wheel Trans’ buses have a similar look to regular TTC buses, but are smaller and they make longer stops to help people on who need assistance. The fare for Wheel Trans is the same as the regular TTC, but Wheel Trans will transport individuals with limited mobility to their exact destination right from their own front door. In order to qualify for Wheel Trans services, you must set up an interview with their customer service department to see if you meet the requirements. You also have the option to fill out an online application. All the information you need to get started can be found HERE. Public Services for the Elderly in Toronto: Meals on Wheels Another great service the city of Toronto has to offer seniors...

Living with Lupus

Living with Lupus is an ongoing struggle for those who have contracted the disease. A chronic autoimmune disease, Lupus can affect the entire body with a hyperactive immune system attacking normal, healthy tissue. Up until recently, a lupus diagnosis was equivalent to a sentence of suffering. Treatments have advanced, and now most lupus cases are manageable. As the world population ages, it is not uncommon to discover people who have developed lupus late in life. Very little is known about Lupus in seniors, but it clearly differs from a younger onset of the disease. It is often misdiagnosed as another rheumatic disease. As a result, a significant delay in its diagnosis is common. How Does Lupus Affect the Body? Lupus is an impairment in the body’s immune system that results in the body attacking its own healthy cells and tissues. This can cause serious damage to basically any and every part of the body. Even if lupus is properly treated, it can still lead to other complications and conditions such as: Increased risk of heart disease Kidney problems Blood clots Headaches Memory loss Seizures Increased susceptibility to infection Living with Lupus: Early Warning Symptoms and diagnosis Lupus can be a particularly tricky disease to recognize and diagnose. There is no single laboratory test that can be administered. The symptoms common to lupus, are also common to numerous other ailments making it difficult to spot, and these symptoms may come and go. It may take several years to get a diagnosis. Usually, four or more of the following eleven criteria must be present to make a lupus: Malar rash: butterfly-shaped rash across cheeks and...
How to Stretch Your Savings After Retirement

How to Stretch Your Savings After Retirement

We would all like to know how to stretch your savings after retirement. Successful financial planning for retirement can be a very challenging task. Even seniors that have diligently planned and saved for retirement can find that the money didn’t last as long as they thought it would. In some cases, seniors simply outlive the savings they put towards retirement. In other cases, seniors may have had to deal with unexpected expenses, or found that expenses were higher than originally predicted. Here are some tips that seniors can use to help those retirement savings go a little further.  Stretch your savings: Investing in your health If you are healthy and your good health allows you control of your daily life, being able to do things yourself will keep your costs down. Many seniors even feel physically and cognitively well enough to maintain some form of employment or income source after their ‘formal retirement’.  Seniors who have good health have the option of doing this, and being able to live from their partial income plus old age pension and CPP, therefore not dipping into savings.  If retirement to you means stopping paid work altogether, investment into your health will still have financial benefits.  Spending time exercising and eating well, while keeping your weight in check will help you ward off one of the most expensive diseases – Alzheimer’s Disease. One of the highest and most burdensome expenses many seniors incur is the cost of healthcare at home or in a facility. Healthcare related costs for the elderly may include: In-home nursing care Eye glasses Hearing aids Medical equipment such as elevators,...

Handling Resistance to Home Care

Resistance to home care is a common situation. Family members providing care for their elderly loved ones need help. Most parents want the care and support to come from their children, and no one else, but there are limits to what busy adult children can provide. Despite your limitations, your parents may still be resistant to hiring in help in the form of home care services. So, what can you do? The first step is to try to understand where the resistance to home care is coming from.  Probable roots of resistance to home care Typically, resistance to home care stems from: fear of losing independence hurt pride that someone feels you cannot handle your life anymore not wanting anyone in your house or the invasion of privacy the natural stubbornness of your loved one’s personality Losing independence is a difficult one; it is true that having hired help in the house is a loss of independence, but not having the hired help over time will almost certainly lead to a catastrophic situation (getting into the bath and not being able to get out until someone enters your home to look for you) that will trigger a probably forced entry into assisted living or long term care facility. So if you are discussing loss of independence with your parents, a phrase like  “giving up some independence in order to stay largely independent overall” is sometimes helpful. Pride of running your own home, yard, and meals is common to the elderly generation today. Young baby boomers, and those in their 40s see housekeepers, landscapers, and meal services as a luxury and are...
Click here forFree CareAssessment